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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to deal with him every week? and he has failed in foreign policy. what's the point of this whole thing? what's the point of this exercise? 'cause we know his real feelings. >> well, i certainly don't. look it, the president or foreign policy or our position with regard to the world and the way the world views us in the same way you do, sean, that's not going to be a big surprise, first of all, the palestinian-- >> suck up to the muslim world work? and he's-- >> i don't feel he did, i don't feel he did. >> sean: oh, stop, please. >> and i feel those were highlights that were distracting and we' are trivializing these issues. every president had problems besides bill clinton because israel does not want to establish a two-state solution and that's the-- >> and he said he was going to fix this and he wasn't able to. saying america was arrogant in cairo didn't work, did it, colonel west? >> well, sean, let's start with andrea mitchell over at msnbc, said this is the worst relationship she's seen and she's been covering since ronald reagan. and the first interview was al-arabi al-arabiya. a
me, joe, is that acceptable foreign policy in your mind? >> sean, look the prime minister of israel and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term wo
for the opposite. >> i would argue that a more restrained policy is the true conservative foreign policy as it includes two tenants of true conservatism. respect and fiscal discipline. instead of large land wars, we would, when necessary, target our enemy and strike with lethal force. >> when it comes to watching change shift, think about national security. national security was at the heart and soul of the republican party at least for about a generation and a half and democrats owned the national security issue for years. republican his to rely on general in order to gain credibility on foreign policy issues in the 50s. it took the vietnam war and then the iran hostage situation for democrats to lose that. republicans and bush and iraq lost that and it hurt the party and still hasn't recovered ever since. lots of people lost lives. the political impact is something that history should not ignore in this country. mr. russert, back to you. i will see you live tomorrow. >> thank you, chuck. this friday catch the msnbc documentary hubris: selling the iraq war, with our own rachel maddow. f
the timelines regarding iran? in covering the pentagon and foreign policy. elizabeth, you know we have a different u.s. officials have a different notion of when we reach that danger point. the testimony last week was that the ayatollah has still not made the political decision to proceed with nuclear weapons. there's not that same sense at all in israel. >> i feel like i've been talking about this for years. the different timelines. but yes, there's still a different timeline that the u.s., i think the last thing the president said was about a year, israel thinks it's sooner than that. the reality is that israel is going to be in a very difficult position to do a strike itself. we've been through that many times it doesn't have the same capabilities the united states does and the united states is it going to wait until the last possible minute there was a lot of fighting last fall as you remember, about the president not being strong enough, against on iran. that has died down. there's a new israeli government and it's a little bit more moderate. so we're still in the same place. >> a
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
solutions for middle east peace. it will take a lot more in a few days to fix the reckless foreign policy of the last now fewer years. he is aware of the challenge. >> i'm meeting none of these challenges will not be easy. ultimately it's not a hard problem. its hard slog to work through all these issues. it's hard. >> sean: aside from hitting the links in tiger woods and paling around with beyonce, it's hard work being the leader of the world. his trip didn't go entirely as planned. it included the burning of american flag and images of obama himself. then there was some car trump when the armored cadillac limo that was supposed to transport the president, that broke down. they put in the wrong fuel and it had to be towed. what would be a speech but without a few hecklers. >> i believe your future is bound to ours. >> sean: with reminders of the week for his failures to address the problems. is he going to continue? or is he going to chart a new course. now, we bring our distinguished studio audience. thanks for being here. you can give yourself a hand, you know. am i wrong, show of hand
use and throw away the key. i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy. there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly fit in the left/right paradigm that i think would help because we are not the doing well in a lot of the purple and blue states so we do need a candidate that would appeal across the left/right paradigm. >> chris: we have about 30 seconds left. your budget which would balance the budget your plan would balance the budget in five years. paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years. you introduced it three consecutive years if and the most votes was this weekend when you got 18. isn't that out o of the mainstream? >> the thing is i think the legislature is ten years pee the public.behind i introduced a bill to quit sending money to egypt. 9 o percent of americans agree with me and 80% of the senators disagree with me. i would argue that the senate is not up-to-date on what the people really want chris thank you for joining us and always good to talk with you, sir. >> thank you. >> chris: up next, the supreme court
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
one but there are very serious foreign policy issues here, not the least of being the civil war in syria. the white house says it is looking into allegations about the use of chemical weapons. the house and intelligence committee says there is quote high probability that chemical agents were useed. what will prime minister netanyahu be asking of the united states in terms of ending the on flikt in syria? >> well, first of all, the president, president obama's, credibility is very, very critical. they is said from the white house podium that any use from the chemical weapons would be a red line. presumably this would be the trigger for more american involvement. as you know, craig, u.s. has been behind other allies, britain and france pressing on the u.s. to do more. we have done human. aid, nonlethal aid, helped to the combatance, but not what they have been pleading for. which is more weaponry. so there's a lot of pressure on the white house to become more involved in syria. this is skoesten shl because they have to wonder about what will follow the civil war. if assad is going
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
away the key. so, i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy and there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly left in the left-right paradigm that i think would help, because we're not doing very well in a lot of these states, purple and blue states and we need a candidate that would appeal across the left-right paradigm. >> chris: briefly, 30 seconds left, though. your budget which would balance the budget, your plan, would balance the budget in five years, paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years, you have introduced it three consecutive years in the senate, the most votes you got was this weekend when you got 18 of 100 senators, isn't it out of the mainstream? >> well, the thing is, i think the legislature is about ten years behind the public. for example, i have introduced amendments to quit sending money to egypt and build bridges here in the the united states instead of in egypt. and i bet you 90% of the american people agree with me but 80% of my senators disagree. i argue the senate is not up-to-date with
immigration, foreign policy, and jams in the politics lead. ♪ wireless is limitless. [ female announcer ] from finding the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> the politics lead. republican leaders in congress looking for momentum on immigration reform got a boost from senator and tea party fave rand paul. paul spoke this morning at the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce setting a tone that reminded some of president george w. bush. >> i think the conversation needs to start by acknowledging that we aren't going to deport 12 million illegal immigrants. if you wish to work, if you wish to live and work in america then we will find a place for you. >> joining us right now for reaction to this and other news of the day of course is senator marco rubio, republican of florida. senator, thanks for joining us. what is your reaction to rand paul's announcement today? how important is this to the cause of immigration reform? >> well, first
foreign policy. each case is treated as an isolated situation. look at this itinerary, what he has planned there is not much to improve the relationship with the israeli government in a content level. martha: president obama has said we are not sort of this super power that we used to be in many ways. the world has changed, right? so there is an opportunity here to be a leader, in terms of israel. to go to israel, doug and say look nothing has changed in this relationship we are steadfast in our support of israel, which of course he has said but some people feel the meaning behind it hasn't been as forceful as in the past. >> i agree with you, martha, if he goes and does that and i fully expect he will, that is an important state. standing with our only stable democratic ally in the middle east is hugely important given the unrest in egypt and throughout the region. i think that clarifying positions on iran, the red line and what we're prepared to do and where we've prepared to do it is critically important. i'm glad he's willing to do that even if it's limited to just that. martha: look a
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
to be realistic. the young people who are there and who applauded ally will not be shaping foreign policy and we have to deal with the government that exists. it's a coalition government of really intense contradictions and we, therefore, have to be very clear in asserting what we consider to be the vital interests of the united states which are automatically good for israel. because if the united states is healthy and strong and predominant in the region, israel is totally secure. let's not forget, sdentally something very important which the press hasn't played up at all in recent months but yet it is a very telling fact. israel and the united states tend to be almost completely isolated in the middle east. not only in terms of the middle eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, ve
foreign policy? how are we doing muddling through this remarkable period of uncertainty? >> you know, i think we're muddling through is the best way i can put it. certain steps i think that have been positive, many that have been negative. i think the president when we saw the demonstrations in 2011 what the president did in calling for the end of hosni mubarak to step down this is a recognition this is a big deal and we need to get on the side of the populations understanding the public will be more empowered. other governments dictatorship, regimes in the gulf, close allies let's admit nondemocratic allies saw that and were frightened and they bring this up when they talk to their american partners. >> the saudis were on the phone. >> we saw you do that to mubarak. are we next? there are consequences to doing that. it's a error and we're feeling our way around. nine fairness we didn't immediately step in. we didn't see people revolting and automatically take the side of the people. we waited on that. we are late across the region. we're supportive of a syrian revolution and clamping
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
that the chairlady just asked to be put in order are incredibly fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interests in international organizations. that's what some of these amendments will to. and you don't do it in a budget process. do you it through regular order in a committee that ultimately can hear both sides, as we have succeeded so far in this session in a very bipartisan way. so i will not object because of the gentlelady's effort to get us to a conclusion. but i will be urging all of our colleagues to oppose all of those amendments because this is foreign policy on the fly, and it is dangerous. and we send very important messages when we cast votes in certain ways that can affect the balance of stability in the middle east, that can affect our relationships across the world, that can affect our effectiveness in institutions that we need at the end of the day to promote our national security and our national interests. mrs. murray: madam president? the pr
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)